Archive for March, 2009

God’s Garden

March 31, 2009

Silouan clued me (and others via facebook) to a documentary project in the works called “God’s Garden.”

To describe the intent of this film project, I will share words from the “God’s Garden” website:

God’s Garden is a journey of faith, race, and redemption through the eyes of Fr. Moses Berry, an African-American Orthodox Christian priest. It chronicles his incredible life as a direct descendent of frontier legend, Daniel Boone, through idyllic beginnings as a child in the Ozarks, a dramatic awakening and miraculous release from jail, and to a surprising discovery in his African-American roots. A young Fr. Moses once asked his mother, “Why are there so many races?” To which she replied, “We are all flowers in God’s Garden.”

Watch the promo:

To learn more about “God’s Garden” or to help make this documentary a reality, visit their website: http://www.godsgardenthefilm.com/

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Corned “Beefless” & Cabbage

March 28, 2009

I do not know about you, but as a kid my folks always made corned beef and cabbage on St. Patrick’s Day. Even though the Mrs and I have never celebrated St. Patrick’s Day in that manner… to me it has always seemed the appropriate way. But since we were baptised, the way of the corned beef has definately been on the outs, even if I wanted to go that route for old times sake.

A couple of days ago the following “recipe” came to me via email… not sure if we will rock it that way at our house, but passing it on just the same.

THIS Lenten fare is probably closer to what St. Patrick would have eaten; more so then the food that I grew up celebrating his day
with.

“St. Padrig’s Day Lenten Corned “Beefless” & Cabbage(Vegan)”

The Orthodox Christian Saint Patrick, Bishop and Enlightener of Ireland, departed this life on March 17th (on the Church calendar) in the year 461 AD. St. Patrick’s “Feast Day” always falls within the Orthodox fasting period of Great Lent – so, no “corned beef” (salted beef) is found on our tables! The following is a substitute we came up with one year, in honor of the occasion. We found it to be very tasty when served after Pre-Sanctified Divine Liturgy.
2 Bay Leaves
1 Tbsp. Whole Allspice
1 Tsp. Whole Black Peppercorns
1 Tsp. Whole Mustard Seed
Place the spices in a small cloth bag or piece of secured muslin cloth.
Good, Rich Vegetable Broth or Vegetable Stock
Cook the following vegetable and spices in the vegetable stock:
1 Head Cabbage, Cut into Wedges
1 Lb. Carrots, Cut into thirds
2 Lg. Onions, Cut into Wedges
2 Stalks Celery plus Celery Greens
2 Turnips, Cut into Large Chunks, Optional
Plenty of Salt, to taste

In a separate pot of boiling water, cook:
5 Lbs. Red-skinned Potatoes, Cut into Halves or Quarters
When the vegetables are tender, drain the potatoes. (Save the potato water for vegetable stock or liquid in breads.)
Add and stir into the potatoes:
Fresh Parsley, Minced
1/2 Stick Lenten Margarine
Salt, to taste
Serve the cabbage and other vegetables in their broth.
Serve the potatoes separately.
Have on hand some Fresh Horseradish Sauce.
Serve with Irish Bread & a good Pint of Ale on the side!
Happy Saint Patrick’s Day!

For some other vegan St. Patrick’s day food ideas, check

here

.

5ive

March 25, 2009

andrew

Happy Birthday to our little grommit: Andrew, who turns five years old today.

Relics of St. Benedict discovered in British Museum

March 25, 2009

14-01

This coming Friday- mar 27 (mar 14 on the Church calendar) St. Benedict of Nursia is commemorated.

Due to my own appreciation of St. Benedict and the closeness of St. Benedict’s Feast Day, an article from the Irish Times caught my eye.

According to the Irish Times article, the relics of St. Benedict along with 38 others were found in a bundle of cloth in a German 12th Century wooden altar at the British Museum; prior to the altar going on display at the museum.

The relics, packed in tiny bundles of cloth, including one scrap of fabric more than 1,000 years old, were found when a 12th-century German portable altar was opened for the first time since it came into the British Museum collection in 1902.

It was in for a condition check and cleaning before going on display…. But to the amazement of James Robinson, curator of medieval antiquities, when it was opened a linen cloth was revealed, and inside it dozens of tiny bundles of cloth, each neatly labelled on little pieces of vellum.

The article continues:

The most precious was the relic of St Benedict, an Italian who in the early 6th century was credited as the father of the western monastic tradition, founding monasteries and establishing guiding principles still followed at many monasteries. The relic was wrapped in cloth which was itself an extraordinary object, a piece of silk from 8th- or 9th-century Byzantium.

–Read the entire Irish Times article, online: here.
–Read more about St. Benedict of Nursia here.

–Props to The Permanent Things and Clerical Whispers.

What is the use….

March 24, 2009

I read the following words this morning:

“What is the use of knowing our weakness if we do not implore God to sustain us with His power? What is the value of recognizing our poverty if we never use it to entreat His mercy? It is bad enough to be complacent in the thought that we have virtue, but worse to rest in careless inertia when we are conscious of our weakness and of our sins. The value of our weakness and of our poverty is that they are the earth in which God sows the seed of desire. And no matter how abandoned we may seem to be, the confident desire to love Him in spite of our abject misery is the sign of His presence and the pledge of our salvation.”Thomas Merton

From the book: ‘Thoughts In Solitude’ (chptr 11)

look alike?

March 22, 2009

Confession: I am a fan of the Donovan. I have actually seen him perform live once.

Anyways.

I came across a video of a band covering one of Donovan’s hits: Hurdy Gurdy Man. Now the cover is… okay. But the reason I decided to post it is because…. Well, umm. Is it just me, or does the guy who is singing have a resemblance to former Branch Davidian leader David Koresh?

i am a mess but God loves me

March 8, 2009

The people around me know that more often than not my dog, Ashur, drives me nuts. It is not that Ashur does anything that he shouldn’t… he is pretty much a normal dog. Actually he is pretty much a good dog that is great for my kids and barks at the right times. I think it is me– I am a guy with a dog that loves me, but I am not much of a dog person.

But we co-exist. Usually with me being a bit peeved because he didn’t poop in the right place in the yard or because he ate Andrew’s sandwich which he left on the floor or because he is always in my space. But because I want to be a good pet owner, I try to be aware of Ashur’s assorted needs.

And occassionaly through no effort of his own, Ashur teaches me something.

Today Ashur taught me something about me… more specifically about God and me.

It dawned on me that Ashur probably understands and knows me about as much as I understand God (truth be told, he probably understands me better than I understand and know God.)

As I realize how little I know and understand God, I acknowledge how much in the midst of my lack I depend on His mercy towards me… His patience towards me… His love towards me.

Just as Ashur will never be a perfect dog, I will never fully be the man God wanted me to be on this side of Heaven–but I try. And as I try all I can fall on is God’s mercy, patience and love towards me.

Aware that without God’s mercy, patience and love it I have no hope to press on.